DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

MONIQUE NAZARETH

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

CANDACE KELLEY

DAVID SICILIA

NOEL HOLSTON

JONATHAN STORM

 
Best Buy Co, Inc.
Fandango Gift Cards
 
 
 
 
2011
Feb
20
 
 
The appeal of writing for TV Worth Watching has always been the chance to steer readers to good shows -- and there are quite a few out there that are extraordinary. It feels like a noble calling. This is not the easiest task in the wonderful world of TV criticism, mind you. Spinning out a snarky pan is a hundred times easier than trying to craft a cogent explanation of what makes a TV show worth watching...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2009
Jul
16
 
 
For viewers disgusted by the obsessive news coverage of Michael Jackson's death and memorial extravaganza, Judge Sonia Sotomayor's weeklong grilling before the Senate Judiciary Committee provided enough serious TV news to satisfy...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Diane Holloway

After three decades as the TV critic for the Austin American-Statesman, Diane has returned to her first love, politics. She is the staff writer for the Travis County Democrats and new media maven for Central Texas politics. But her love for TV has not faded, and she is embarrassed to say she still watches more than she reads. In her spare time, she works with homeless Texans and complains about the heat.
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is now avaialble on Amazon.

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

New From TVWW

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Grant Tinker: 1925-2016
By David Bianculli
 
 
 
 

Dispatches From TVWW

RIP Grant Tinker
By Ed Bark
 
 
 
 
Grant Tinker: An Appreciation
By Tom Brinkmoeller
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This Day in TV History