2017
Jun
29
 
 
On this day in 1957, a comic named Jack Paar took over the NBC late-night program formerly known as Tonight (and presently known as The Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon). Tonight launched in 1954 as a live, late-night variety/talk show with Steve Allen as host. When Allen landed his own weekly prime-time series in 1956, he cut back his Tonight hosting duties to three nights a week (with Ernie Kovacs stepping in as the show's host each Monday and Tuesday). In 1957, when Allen left the show al
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jun
28
 
 
On this day in 1973, NBC introduced the summer variety series, The Helen Reddy Show...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jun
27
 
 
This day in 1966 marked the debut of the gothic daytime soap opera Dark Shadows on ABC...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jun
26
 
 
The Garry Moore Show debuted on this day in 1950...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jun
25
 
 
This day in 1957 marked the final telecast of The Jonathan Winters Show on NBC...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jun
24
 
 
On this day in 1956, yet another incarnation of The Steve Allen Show appeared on television...

 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jun
23
 
 
American Masters premiered on PBS on this day in 1986...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jun
22
 
 
This day in 1957 marked the debut of The George Sanders Mystery Theater on NBC...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jun
21
 
 
This day in 2005 marked the final telecast of Steven Bochco's short-lived series, Blind Justice...
 
 
 
  
 
 
2017
Jun
20
 
 
This day in 1968 marked the debut of the NBC summer replacement variety series, Dean Martin Presents...
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Good news, TVWW readers: David’s new book from Doubleday, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is available on Amazon for $20. (Paperback will be available September 5th, here.)

Doubleday says: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way."

"The Platinum Age of Television is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era of quality TV. For instance, animation evolved from Rocky and His Friends to South Park; variety shows moved from The Ed Sullivan Show to Saturday Night Live; and family sitcoms grew from I Love Lucy to Modern Family. A high point is the author’s interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Bob Newhart, Matt Groening, Larry David, Amy Schumer and many others...Bianculli has written a highly readable history." —The Washington Post

 

This Day in TV History