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(The visual joke above - courtesy of Eric Gould, TVWW contributor, and who, designed TVWW 1.0 working from my cave-painting visuals - is aimed purely at baby boomers. Otherwise, the explanation is barely worth the time. But in a '60s cop show called The Mod Squad, there was this actor named Clarence Williams III (later Prince's dad in Purple Rain), whose character sported a huge Afro, and was named Linc. Hence, multiple images of him for the "Lincs" page. Makes me laugh every time. –DB)

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Good news, TVWW readers: An advance copy of David’s upcoming book from Doubleday has just arrived! The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific is now available on Amazon for pre-order for its November 15th release. You can read some of the dustcover summary here, including: “Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his. Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way. In tracing the evolutionary history of our progress toward a Platinum Age of Television,…he focuses on the development of the classic TV genres, among them the sitcom, the crime show, the miniseries, the soap opera, the Western, the animated series and the variety show. David Bianculli's book is the first to date to examine, in depth and in detail and with a keen critical and historical sense, including exclusive and in-depth interviews with many of the most famed auteurs in television history.” —TVWW