DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

MIKE HUGHES

GARY EDGERTON

ROGER CATLIN

KIM AKASS

GERALD JORDAN

TOM BRINKMOELLER

NOEL HOLSTON

 
 
Enter your email address:
 
 
 
 
TUESDAY
OCTOBER 22
2019

BIANCULLI’S BEST BETS

 

Fox, 7:30 p.m. ET

The Washington Nationals, having fought all the way from the National League Wild-Card Game to make it to this year’s World Series, is the underdog team, and the Houston Astros, who just outplayed the New York Yankees (again) to advance (again), have home-field advantage for tonight’s opening game. The Astros are playing in the big game for the second time in three years, while this is the Nationals’ first shot at the World Series. It may sound like a mismatch – but the way the Nationals have been pitching, and the Astros have been playing, this could turn out to be a great, and seven-game, World Series. And it all starts here…
 
  
 
 

Starz!, 9:38 p.m. ET

Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy became a silent-movie comedy team in 1927, just as the cinema was about to make a transition to sound films. They survived that transition, where many silent stars did not, by having vocal comic timing, and distinctively funny voices, as well as their established mastery of physical pratfalls and facial reactions. In 1932, they made one of the funniest short films ever made, The Music Box. And 21 years later, in the twilight of their careers, they embarked on a tour of British music halls, which is where and when Stan & Ollie is set. It’s a singularly narrow focus and smart idea for a movie, and it’s hit over the fence by the actors playing these screen icons. British star Steve Coogan plays Stan Laurel, and John C. Reilly, believe it or not, makes an equally believable Oliver Hardy.
 
  
 
 

PBS, 10:00 p.m. ET

This is the first of three PBS Frontline documentaries this season devoted to the immigration policies of President Donald Trump. This first hour is an “origin story” of sorts, tracing the policy to a troika of Trump associates: Stephen Miller, Jeff Sessions, and Steve Bannon.Check local listings.
 
  
 
 
 
 
Read and add comments HERE for today's Best Bets!
 
 

TV WE'RE WATCHING

  
   Visit our TV We're Watching page for these and other shows on our DVRs right now...



The Circus
Showtime
Sundays
8 PM ET  

The Deuce
HBO
Mondays
9 PM ET 

Evil
CBS
Thursdays
10 PM ET  

The Good Place
NBC
Thursdays
9 PM ET  

Modern Love
Streaming
Amazon Prime 

Mr. Robot
USA
Sundays
10 PM ET 
 

Real Time with Bill Maher
HBO
Fridays
10 PM ET 

This is Us
NBC
Tuesdays
9 PM ET 
 
  

Watchmen
HBO
Sundays
9 PM ET 

Why We Hate
Discovery
Sundays
10 PM ET
 
 

VIDEO WORTH WATCHING

And Our Friends Are All Aboard– On the week and month that Abbey Roadis re-released on its golden anniversary, it doesn't seem that improper to go from golden to yellow — and to Ringo Starr's recent visit to NBC's Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, where the host, the guest, and the Roots all grabbed classroom instruments and dove into a very animated version of "Yellow Submarine." My grandkids can sing along. You should, too. – David Bianculli

 
 

BUT WAIT... THERE'S MORE!


FRESH AIR FAVES

Audio of Bianculli's favorite 'Fresh Air' reports, and the stories behind them...


FAVES FROM
"THE MORGUE"

Bianculli's favorite newspaper articles, and the stories behind them...


EXTRAS & FEEDBACK

Share your favorite TV in-jokes and first TV loves...
 
 
 
Good News TVWW readers: Television Finales: From Howdy Doody to Girls, the new collection edited by Douglas Howard and TVWW’s David Bianculli, is now on sale. More than ever, series finales have become cultural touchstones that feed watercooler fodder and tweet storms. TV Finales brings together seventy chapters, each focusing on a separate show, including reliable milestones such as The Fugitive and M*A*S*H through cutting-edge favorites like Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Breaking Bad. Writers include today’s leading TV critics, along with many TVWW contributors. "The last word on TV endings." (Matt Zoller Seitz, New York Magazine)
 
 
Television today is better than ever, and David’s book, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific explores it all and how we got here. (Now on sale for $12). David maps the evolution of the classic TV genres – the sitcom, the crime show, doctor dramas, the Western – and many others. "The Platinum Age is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era... interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Matt Groening, Larry David, and Amy Schumer are high points. Bianculli has written a highly readable history." –The Washington Post
 
 
 

This Day in TV History