DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

KARLE DUNBAR

Social Media Manager

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

NOEL HOLSTON

GARY EDGERTON

GERALD JORDAN

ROGER CATLIN

CANDACE KELLEY

TOM BRINKMOELLER

MONIQUE NAZARETH

DAVID SICILIA

GABRIELA TAMARIZ

JONATHAN STORM

 
 
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SATURDAY
MAY 25
2019

BIANCULLI’S BEST BETS

 

TCM, 6:00 p.m. ET

I really enjoyed this action comedy-drama when it came out in 1973 – and the intervening decades have treated it very well. Director Richard Lester, who is the guy who captured The Beatles so brilliantly in A Hard Day’s Night, brings the Alexandre Dumas novel to vivid life. The settings are alternately sumptuous and squalid, the action veers between slapstick and swashbuckling, and the casting is inspired. Michael York stars as D’Artagnan, the wide-eyed young man who duels, befriends and ultimately expands the ranks of the Three Musketeers – who are played, so playfully and winningly, by Richard Chamberlain (Aramis), Oliver Reed (Athos) and Frank Finlay (Porthos). The bad guys are played by Christopher Lee and Charlton Heston, and the women of the court are played, dazzlingly, by Faye Dunaway, Geraldine Chaplin, and Raquel Welch. If none of that entices you to tune in, I give up.

 
  
 
 

HBO, 8:00 p.m. ET

In this 2018 horror slasher film, Jamie Lee Curtis stars as Laurie Strode – a role she first played 40 years earlier, in John Carpenter’s influential 1978 film of the same name. The plot of this new film acknowledges the passage of that much time, and revisits, four decades later, the woman who was the only surviving teenager among the major characters in that first Halloween film – which, by the way, was Curtis’ film debut. And Curtis, of course, is the daughter of Janet Leigh, who had starred 18 years earlier in the most famous slasher movie of all time: Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho.

 
  
 
 
 
 
Read and add comments HERE for today's Best Bets!
 
 

TV WE'RE WATCHING

  
   Visit our TV We're Watching page for these and other shows on our DVRs right now...



1969
ABC
Tuesdays
10 PM ET

Brockmire
IFC
Wednesdays
10 PM ET

Catch-22
Hulu
Streaming

Dead to Me
Netflix
Streaming

Fleabag
Prime Video
Streaming

Fosse/Verdon
FX
Tuesdays
10 PM ET

Gentleman Jack
HBO
Mondays
10 PM ET

iZombie
CW
Thursdays
8 PM ET

Killing Eve
BBC America
Sundays
8 PM ET

The Name of the Rose
Sundance
Thursdays
10 PM ET
 
 

VIDEO WORTH WATCHING

Game of Tones — You weren’t alone if you thought last Sunday’s must-see Game of Thrones episode, “Battle of Winterfell” (April 28) was so dim and dark, you thought there was something wrong with your TV. (There wasn’t.) See here how Conan upped the brightness on his set and find out why the episode was so muddy. — Eric Gould

 
 

BUT WAIT... THERE'S MORE!


FRESH AIR FAVES

Audio of Bianculli's favorite 'Fresh Air' reports, and the stories behind them...


FAVES FROM
"THE MORGUE"

Bianculli's favorite newspaper articles, and the stories behind them...


EXTRAS & FEEDBACK

Share your favorite TV in-jokes and first TV loves...
 
 
 
Good News TVWW readers: Television Finales: From Howdy Doody to Girls, the new collection edited by Douglas Howard and TVWW’s David Bianculli, is now on sale. More than ever, series finales have become cultural touchstones that feed watercooler fodder and tweet storms. TV Finales brings together seventy chapters, each focusing on a separate show, including reliable milestones such as The Fugitive and M*A*S*H through cutting-edge favorites like Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Breaking Bad. Writers include today’s leading TV critics, along with many TVWW contributors. "The last word on TV endings." (Matt Zoller Seitz, New York Magazine)
 
 
Television today is better than ever, and David’s book, The Platinum Age of Television: From I Love Lucy to The Walking Dead, How TV Became Terrific explores it all and how we got here. (Now on sale for $12). David maps the evolution of the classic TV genres – the sitcom, the crime show, doctor dramas, the Western – and many others. "The Platinum Age is an effusive guidebook that plots the path from the 1950s’ Golden Age to today’s era... interviews with Carl Reiner, Mel Brooks, Norman Lear, Matt Groening, Larry David, and Amy Schumer are high points. Bianculli has written a highly readable history." –The Washington Post
 
 
 

This Day in TV History

 
 
 

New This WWeek
Series and specials in variety formats