DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

MIKE HUGHES

KIM AKASS

MONIQUE NAZARETH

ROGER CATLIN

GARY EDGERTON

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

NOEL HOLSTON

 
 
 
 
 
1951: Radio's 'Amos 'n' Andy' Moves to TV
June 28, 2012  | By Christy Slewinski  | 1 comment
 
On this day in 1951, CBS debuted Amos 'n' Andy, the television version of the longest-running (and one of the most popular) radio programs in broadcast history. The television show was produced by the radio show's stars, Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll. Since both men were white, African-American actors — including (left to right) Spencer Williams Jr. as Andy, Alvin Childress as Amos and Tim Moore as George "The Kingfish" Stevens — were brought in for the television adaptation.

The show, set in Harlem, revolved around George Stevens, who was constantly looking for ways to make fast money, and often involved those around him in his schemes. Andy was one of his more gullible friends; Amos was a neighborhood cab driver who provided narration for the show.

The show was a commercial success, but there was a strong undercurrent of controversy. Many members of the black community accused the show of ethnic stereotyping. The ongoing protests played a part in the show's cancellation in 1953.

From a TV history perspective, Amos 'n' Andy was the very first television show to have an all-black cast. It was also one of the first television programs to be filmed with a multi-camera set-up.




 
 
 
 
 
Leave a Comment: (No HTML, 1000 chars max)
 
 Name (required)
 
 Email (required) (will not be published)
 
XDGCI
Type in the verification word shown on the image.
 
 
 Page: 1 of 1  | Go to page: 
1 Comments
 
 
Peter Orilia
It's a shame that Political Correctness caused what could have been a 20-year run of a very funny series. As a child, I did not see them as "black people" but simply as funny people who were black. I purchased the DVD box set and sometimes allow myself the "guilty pleasure" of watching an episode or two. 60 years later, the jokes still work. FUNNY IS FUNNY, PERIOD
Jun 25, 2015   |  Reply
 
 
 
 Page: 1 of 1  | Go to page: