DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

MIKE HUGHES

KIM AKASS

MONIQUE NAZARETH

ROGER CATLIN

GARY EDGERTON

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

NOEL HOLSTON

 
 
 
 
 
Super Debate, Super "Lost," Super Bowl, Super Duper Tuesday
February 1, 2008  | By David Bianculli
 
After months of moaning the length and impact of the writers' strike, let's sound a different note today - and give thanks for four nationally televised events, just presented or upcoming, that qualify as both popular and important. In all four cases, TV is better for them.

cnn-dem-debate-jan-31.jpgOne: Last night's CNN Democratic presidential candidates debate, the first after the field had been winnowed to just Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. Refreshingly civil and unusually specific, it presented both candidates and their policies well - and, for the most part, also presented television in a good light. TV actually adding to the political discourse in a civil and informative way: What a concept. With luck, it might catch on.

Two: Last night's premiere of Lost on ABC. It was a reminder of just how good broadcast TV can be when it's in the right hands. For my Fresh Air review, listen here.

Three: Sunday's Super Bowl XLII on Fox. Sure, it's going to be the biggest TV event of the year. Invariably, it is. But this year, with the undefeated New England Patriots going against Eli Manning and the New York Giants, it's a major-market, big-story showdown for the ages. Even if it is a rout, as most analysts predict, it's a giant piece of sports history. And if the brother of last year's victorious Super Bowl quarterback somehow commandeers a victory, it'll be the biggest Super Bowl upset since Joe Namath led another New York squad, the Jets, past the heavily favored Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III - and that was XXXIX years ago.

Four: Tuesday is being called Super Duper Tuesday (how mature), because so many delegates and states are in play, it really is the equivalent of a national political primary. It's the biggest night yet in a political narrative that already has had more surprises and shifts than anyone predicted - so much so that predictions and polling data, themselves, are suspect this year. That makes the coverage Tuesday night, whatever happens and wherever you turn, another important night of television.

Reasons to watch TV these days? That's four, right there, in less than a week's time.

 
 
 
 
 
Leave a Comment: (No HTML, 1000 chars max)
 
 Name (required)
 
 Email (required) (will not be published)
 
OXPQY
Type in the verification word shown on the image.