DAVID BIANCULLI

Founder / Editor

ERIC GOULD

Associate Editor

LINDA DONOVAN

Assistant Editor

Contributors

ALEX STRACHAN

MIKE HUGHES

KIM AKASS

MONIQUE NAZARETH

ROGER CATLIN

GARY EDGERTON

TOM BRINKMOELLER

GERALD JORDAN

NOEL HOLSTON

 
 
 
 
 
LAUREL AND HARDY DOUBLE FEATURE
December 7, 2020  | By David Bianculli

TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

 
I have a special affection, right now, for anything on TV that can make me laugh – so I’m especially pleased to point out that tonight, TCM presents a double feature of movies by Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Both of these comic actors started out as supporting players in silent short films for the Hal Roach Studio, working independently in the 1910s, then teaming together to become stars of the silent era in the 1920s. Then then became one of the few acts of that era to make the transition, seamlessly and seemingly effortlessly, to the sound era, by keeping all their beloved silent mannerisms and comedy bits, and adding perfectly timed and delivered dialogue. Pardon Us, which begins tonight’s TCM double feature, was the first full-length Laurel and Hardy movie. Filmed in 1930 and released in 1931, it has the duo sent to prison after trying to sell some illegal home-brewed alcohol to a policeman during Prohibition. One scene that deserves special mention today: Just as Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis in Some Like It Hot evaded pursuers by dressing in drag, Laurel and Hardy in Pardon Us hide out, for a while, by donning blackface and picking cotton on a Southern plantation (pictured). The second film is the much more famous 1934 comedy Sons of the Desert, in which they lie to their wives in order to attend a convention of their beloved Sons of the Desert lodge.
 
 
 
 
 
Leave a Comment: (No HTML, 1000 chars max)
 
 Name (required)
 
 Email (required) (will not be published)
 
DQXOC
Type in the verification word shown on the image.