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2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY
November 21, 2020  | By David Bianculli  | 1 comment

TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

 
Time machines are one of the most cherished tropes in the sci-fi genre – and though time machines to do not figure in either of the pivotal sci-fi films shown tonight as a double feature by TCM, they do allow us to take a time-machine trip of sorts. They allow us to watch, in sequence, futuristic films by two of their generation’s most innovative and influential filmmakers: Stanley Kubrick and George Lucas. So imagine you’ve just set your Wayback Machine, and start with 1968, when Kubrick befuddled and dazzled the world with his classic sci-fi trip, 2001: A Space Odyssey. When it premiered, and when I saw it that opening day, the actual year of 2001 was still 33 years in the future – a third of a generation away. One lengthy sequence involved a space shuttle to a lunar base, at a time when man landing on the moon was still a year away. And now, we’re close to 20 years removed from the actual 2001 – and so much of the science in the Arthur C. Clarke-Stanley Kubrick collaboration has held up amazingly well. 2001: A Space Odyssey made Kubrick a recognized and powerful auteur for the rest of his life – and with good reason. Watch from the start, with the lights off and the sound up, on as big a TV as you have. And then, after the climax, think and argue about it all over again.
 
 
 
 
 
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1 Comments
 
 
Dave Brown
I'll set my DVR for this classic, thanks. (BTW, 33 years is a third of a *century*, not a third of a generation.)
Nov 21, 2020   |  Reply
 
 
 
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